Tag Archives: tutorial

Easter Themed Wax Puck Resist Tutorial

WAX PUCK RESIST TUTORIAL

Our Wax Pucks are made from 100% beeswax. These handy little discs fit perfectly in the palm of your hand and are very versatile. Wax Pucks create a resist in between layers of Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint and are also great for rubbing along stubborn drawer runners to get them moving again.

Today, we’d like to teach you how to layer two different colors of MMS Milk Paint using a Wax Puck resist in between! The subject of this tutorial are these adorable wooden bunnies.

wax puck, resist, miss mustard seeds milk paint, cover photo

CREATING A LAYERED LOOK USING A WAX PUCK

  1. To achieve a layered look, apply one coat of milk paint and allow it to dry.
  2. Next, rub the Wax Puck over the edges, corners and “high points” of the piece.  Anywhere the wax is applied, milk paint will resist adhering. Make sure you rub the Wax Puck randomly around and in places where paint would naturally wear over time.
  3. Then, apply a second coat of milk paint in a contrasting color and allow it to dry completely.
  4. Using sandpaper, distress the surface to easily remove the paint where wax was applied, revealing first coat underneath.
  5. Seal your piece with any of our fine finishes.

VIDEO TUTORIAL

Watch this video tutorial to see the process in action! This video was created by Jenn Baker of Eight Hundred Furniture.

Didn’t those bunnies turn out super cute?

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A Wax Puck resist work best when you layer high contrasting colors over one another. This is Outback Petticoat with French Enamel on top.

french enamel, outback petticoat, wax puck, resist, miss mustard seeds milk paint, furniture wax

For a more subtle look, layer softer colors over one another. This is Arabesque over Schloss.

arabesque, schloss, wax puck, resist, miss mustard seeds milk paint

Layering colors in the same family provides a two toned look. This is Boxwood over Lucketts Green.

boxwood, lucketts green, wax puck, resist, miss mustard seeds milk paint, cover photo

You can replicate this look on any surface. Jenn used wooden bunnies that she picked up for one of her paint workshops. You can visit the unfinished wood section of your local craft store to pick up something similar just in time for Easter!

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MMSMP Whitewash Technique – Designs by Donnie

We are beyond excited to share this post with you today! One of our MMSMP Featured Artisans, Donnie Galli of Designs by Donnie, is sharing how he creates his characteristic whitewash technique using Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint products!

Yep, that’s right! He’s giving you a tutorial on how to create that gorgeous finish above. Oh happy day!

Before we get started, in case you missed our featured post on Donnie’s work, you can catch it by clicking the photo below.

Featured Artisan Designs by Donnie Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint

So without further ado, you can watch Donnie’s tutorial video below.

The products that Donnie used in this tutorial can be purchased from your local retailer. Ask for Farmhouse White Milk Paint, Hemp Oil and Tough Coat. You can buy Hemp Oil by the gallon if you love it as much as he does! Our Milk Paint also comes in larger bulk sizes as well.

Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint Designs by Donnie

To find a MMSMP retailer near you, use our map and see who is in your neighborhood! You can special order the larger sizes of products too. Stop in and chat with a MMSMP retailer for more details!

Now if you don’t have a retailer near you, check our fabulous online shopping options by clicking here. Several of our retailers also sell online and offer wonderful customer service. You can also pick up MMSMP products on Esty, Ebay and Amazon.

So what do you think? Isn’t Donnie’s technique fabulous? We seriously swoon over the exposed wood grain!

Miss Mustard Seed's Milk Paint Farmhouse White Designs by Donnie

To learn more about Donnie and his work, follow him on Facebook and Instagram. His website is another great resource for more information about his creations!

Whitewash Technique Designs By Donnie

We’re definitely excited to be along for the ride!

Donnie Galli

Antiquing Wax Instagram Live Tutorial

Blog post tutorials are very helpful in showing you how to do something step by step.  But, having a video to watch and seeing something happen in real time is a bit more powerful, don’t you think?

On July 2nd, our MMSMP Instagram manager, Jenn Baker of Eight Hundred Furniture, went live and demonstrated how to use our rich Antiquing Wax to enhance carved details on a beautiful little pie crust topped table.

Jenn painted the table in two coats of our warm greige, Schloss, and mixed Bonding Agent into her paint because she didn’t want any chipping to occur.

After the two coats of Schloss were applied, Jenn smooth sanded with 400 grit sandpaper and then sealed her table with Hemp Oil.

After she sealed the table with Hemp Oil, Jenn enhanced the table with our Antiquing Wax when she went live.  We wanted to share the video with you in case you a) missed it, b) wanted to rewatch it or c) wanted to save it for later reference.  So without further delay, you can watch Jenn’s MMSMP Instagram Live broadcast below!

After she was finished waxing the table, Jenn gave the piecrust topped table a proper photo shoot, and you can see how our Antiquing Wax added just the right amount of detailing to the carved bits.

Here’s that lovely scalloped piecrust table top.  You can see how the Antiquing Wax settled onto the ledge and draws your eye around the entire perimeter of the piece.

The effect is quite beautiful!  Can you see how using long strokes across the table helps to create a clean effect rather than swirling the wax on?

Now for the stars of the show…the carvings!

Our Antiquing Wax does such a great job at settling into recessed areas, such as carvings like these.  It adds shadowing and contrast, which helps enhance them and draw your eye in.  Carvings like these are practically begging to be waxed with either of our tinted waxes – White or Antiquing!

Just look at that detail!

The carvings reach all the way down to the feet, and even they got the special Antiquing Wax treatment.  As you wipe Antiquing Wax off, it is removed from the flat surfaces and remains in the low points of the piece, giving you an effect like this:

So what do you think?  Are you inspired to give our Antiquing Wax a try now?  Remember to have a layer of clear product (whether it’s Furniture Wax or Hemp Oil) in between your MMS Milk Paint and the Antiquing Wax.  This will help to give you a cleaner look and avoid any smudging or ghosting.

You can shop for Antiquing Wax from your local MMSMP retailer.  It comes in small and large sizes so you can purchase the right amount for your project.  A small jar of Antiquing Wax would be the right size for a small table like this.

You can find your local MMSMP retailer by searching on our map here.  If there isn’t a retailer in your neighborhood, you can see your online purchasing options here.

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We hope you enjoyed the live broadcast on Instagram!  Make sure you show us your Antiquing Wax projects by tagging @MissMustardSeedsMilkPaint on Facebook and @mmsmilkpaint on Instagram!

Outback Petticoat Pumpkins

Outback Petticoat is the newest color in the Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint collection.

It’s a gorgeous rusty orange that gets its color inspiration from the soil of the Australian Outback.  Settler women would get orange stains on their petticoats as they walked over the soil, so a group of our Australian retailers determined this would be the perfect name for the color.  How fun?!

As Fall is approaching, we thought it would be super fun to share a quick, easy, and Fall-themed DIY project using Outback Petticoat.

The subjects of our project are these sweet little pumpkins.

You can grab these at any craft store in your area, or shop for them online through Amazon or Etsy.  We wanted to show you two different types of pumpkin makeovers so you can see how Milk Paint looks on paper mache…

and on ceramic!

Milk Paint soaks in well to porous surfaces including raw wood, concrete, clay, ceramic, and paper mache.  To begin, you’ll need a few materials – Outback Petticoat Milk Paint, Curio Milk Paint, cups to mix your Milk Paint in, stir sticks, paint brushes, water, and Hemp Oil.

Next, measure out 3-4 tablespoons of Outback Petticoat and dump it into a mixing cup.

Then add the same amount of water and watch the pale orange powder turn into rusty orange goodness!

Using a stir stick, mix the Milk Paint for about one minute straight, making sure to scrape the sides and the bottom of your cup.

Stir well until all of the powder has been mixed into the water.

Once the Milk Paint has been mixed for a minute or two, set it aside to rest for five minutes.  This will give the Outback Petticoat powder a chance to absorb more water.

The ideal consistency you’re looking for is that of melted ice cream.  You want the Milk Paint to run off of your stir stick in a steady stream.  If it drips off, then the paint is too thin and you need to add a touch more powder.  If the Milk Paint is clumpy, then add a touch more water.  Don’t stress about this part – you really can’t mess it up!  It’s just like mixing pancake batter.  For more tips on mixing Milk Paint, you can watch this video from Miss Mustard Seed’s YouTube channel!

Once your Milk Paint is mixed, begin painting your pumpkins!  It may help to hold the ceramic pumpkin in the hole on the bottom so you can paint the body.

Outback Petticoat is the prettiest color to use.  It looks amazing as you brush it out.

As you get near the top of the stems, switch to a smaller brush so it’s easier to get a clean edge.

You don’t have to paint the bottoms if you don’t want to.  (As a tip, you may want to put tiny felt feet on the bottoms of the ceramic pumpkins to avoid scratching the surface of your wood furniture.)

As the paint dries, keep an eye out for spots that sparkle in the light.  That’s the limestone in the Milk Paint!

Allow your first coat of Outback Petticoat to completely dry before applying a second.  We applied two coats on our pumpkins and the coverage was just right!  As the Outback Petticoat is drying, you can mix up a small bit of Curio to use on the stems.  One tablespoon of powder and water will do the trick, as the stems are relatively tiny and you won’t need that much paint.

We advise using a tiny brush for this part so you can create clean lines and wiggle your way around the shape of your pumpkin stems.

We applied two coats of Curio to the stems and allowed our pumpkins to dry for about thirty minutes.  The air was humid on the day these were painted, so a little extra time was needed to make sure everything was dry.

You could leave your Milk Paint pumpkins raw at this point, but both Outback Petticoat and Curio look amazing when finished with our Hemp Oil.

We advise pouring a small amount into a separate cup and using a paintbrush to apply it all over your pumpkins.

As you apply the Hemp Oil over the Milk Paint, you’ll see the magic happen!

Can you see the depth and richness that Milk Paint takes on when it’s sealed with Hemp Oil?  This was our absolute favorite part of this DIY project!  Here are the paper mache pumpkins side-by-side  The left is raw and the right has fresh Hemp Oil on it.

And here are the ceramic pumpkins.  Again, the left is raw and the right has Hemp Oil on it.

Once the pumpkins are covered, gently wipe away the excess Hemp Oil with a lint-free cloth.  Don’t use a paper towel – trust us!  You’ll get little fuzzies all over your pumpkins.

We staged our pumpkins on a wood slice with buds of cotton tucked in.  It doesn’t get more autumnal than that!

While this DIY project used Outback Petticoat as the primary color, you can use any of the gorgeous Milk Paint shades on your pumpkins.  Miss Mustard Seed mixed some bespoke color combinations on a tutorial she shared back in 2013.  She painted real white pumpkins and wrote all about her steps on her blog.

Just make sure you mix in our Bonding Agent if you’re going to paint real pumpkins or else this will happen:

One of the benefits of painting faux pumpkins is that you can use them year after year!

Thanks to Jenn Baker of Eight Hundred Furniture, LLC. for the beautiful photos and the fabulous tutorial.  We also wanted to thank Brenda Shirk of Painted Table Designs for her staging pieces and the beautiful setting of these photos!

Hopefully this tutorial will inspire you to create beautiful Milk Paint pumpkins to add to your Fall decor in your home!

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Milk Painted Chalkboard Tutorial

Hello Milk Painters, this is Jenn Baker of Eight Hundred Furniture and I have a fun tutorial to share with you!

Chalkboards are the perfect project to try if you are brand new to Miss Mustard Seed’s Milk Paint.  They’re fast, easy, inexpensive, and versatile!  Even if you’re a veteran and can Milk Paint with your eyes closed, chalkboard projects are a fun way to paint the day away!

I recently acquired a fantastic chalkboard “specimen” from a local antique market and I couldn’t wait to share it with all of you!

This antique wooden ironing board couldn’t be used for its original purpose anymore because it needed some structural reworking.   The legs were all wonky and it was missing a few parts.  It didn’t sit upright properly, as you can see.  Downward facing dog was about all it could do (much like the sun bathing cat in the background).

I used my flathead screwdriver to completely remove the legs along with their hinges.

I needed to use a tiny head attachment because the screws didn’t have a very deep channel.  Getting adequate torque was a bit challenging, but they all came off eventually.

See?  No more hinges!  (P.S. – Isn’t that wood yummy?!)

Now that the legs were off, I could flip the top over and begin painting it.  I saved the set of double legs that are in the top right corner of the photo below and reattached them so the sign propped up like an easel.

I chose Typewriter for my chalkboard because I wanted a traditional black background.  This was going to go in my antique booth to compliment one of my MMS Milk Paint display, and I wanted it to pop.  My plan was to write upcoming demonstrations and workshops on it so shoppers can take part in the fun!  You could also use a mixture of Boxwood and Artissimo to make a vintage green chalkboard.  The formula is 3 parts Boxwood with 2 parts Artissimo.

Here’s what that vintage green chalkboard mixture looks like.  Isn’t it dreamy?

Like I mentioned, I was using Typewriter, so I would have a traditional black look to my chalkboard.

I mixed up about 3/4 cup of Typewriter powder with the same amount of water in a handleless ironstone cup.  Because I was painting on raw wood, I knew it would be thirsty and soak up a lot of Milk Paint.

I painted two coats of Typewriter on the front and along the sides of the ironing board.  Typewriter has excellent coverage and soon, all of those scratches, nicks, and dings were gone!

Things were looking beautiful about half way through the first coat.

It didn’t take very long to dry either.  Milk Paint soaks in more like a stain rather than laying on the surface like modern paints such as latex or chalk-type paint.  It dries pretty fast on raw wood.  Each coat took about 20 minutes to dry.

After the board was dry, I went over it with 400 grit sandpaper to smooth away some of sediment that didn’t brush out.  I wanted a relatively smooth writing surface, so the 400 grit sandpaper helped.  I did get wind up getting some white specks from the dried pigments, but I was going to season the board with chalk anyway so it didn’t matter.

“Seasoning” a chalkboard is essential to prevent your words from being burned onto the surface.  This is also called “ghosting”.  Basically, you take a piece of chalk, turn it sideways, and rub it all over your new chalkboard.  Here’s Miss Mustard Seed herself demonstrating this step on one of her HGTV tutorials.

After seasoning the chalkboard, I wiped it back with a paper towel.  My last step was to rework the legs so the ironing board stood up more like an easel or a sign.

And voila!  Milk Painted chalkboard complete!

If you would like to make your own Milk Paint chalkboard, here’s a list of materials you’ll need:

  • MMS Milk Paint (Typewriter or 3 parts Boxwood and 2 parts Artissimo)
  • Wooden chalkboard surface (Or you can even use glass!  Just add our Bonding Agent in)
  • Piece of chalk
  • Rag or paper towel
  • Paintbrush
  • Stir stick or mini whisk
  • Mixing cup